Anonymous Asked
Questionthis might be against you're rules on asks, but I just wanted to say that I really appreciate all that you do for us curious fans. your meta is always so well thought out and it must take you forever, so the fact that you take that time is awesome. you're one of my favorite bloggers (you don't need to publish this, just thought I'd send some love in your askbox) Answer

Lol, you can send me love. Or you can feel free to just send me chitchat or whatever. I’m really pretty mild mannered, in spite of my strong writer’s voice (which I have basically no control over) and I’ll happily engage in private conversation. I definitely need to go edit that guidelines page again to make it more inviting, but it seems like it’d be a little weird to be like, “Here are my rules: 1. Ask actual questions, not comments. 2. Send love!”

But THANK YOU. I love love as much as the next person.

the-best-part-of-waking-up:

bonearenaofmyskull:

Y-yes…? Don’t other people think it has a cheerful tone? You don’t end up with a guy shoving a foot down a woodchipper without having a sense of humor, dontcha know.
(I knew I wasn’t going to pass that test. I tried really hard, too. But it was a timed test, and I couldn’t take the pressure.)

fargo is my nickname and for a second i thought ya’ll were talking bout me

I hope you didn’t put anybody in the woodchipper.

the-best-part-of-waking-up:

bonearenaofmyskull:

Y-yes…? Don’t other people think it has a cheerful tone? You don’t end up with a guy shoving a foot down a woodchipper without having a sense of humor, dontcha know.

(I knew I wasn’t going to pass that test. I tried really hard, too. But it was a timed test, and I couldn’t take the pressure.)

fargo is my nickname and for a second i thought ya’ll were talking bout me

I hope you didn’t put anybody in the woodchipper.

Y-yes…? Don’t other people think it has a cheerful tone? You don’t end up with a guy shoving a foot down a woodchipper without having a sense of humor, dontcha know.
(I knew I wasn’t going to pass that test. I tried really hard, too. But it was a timed test, and I couldn’t take the pressure.)

Y-yes…? Don’t other people think it has a cheerful tone? You don’t end up with a guy shoving a foot down a woodchipper without having a sense of humor, dontcha know.

(I knew I wasn’t going to pass that test. I tried really hard, too. But it was a timed test, and I couldn’t take the pressure.)

fauntasy:

haha I’ll pass

FREE HOT BREAKFAST

and indoor pools

of blood

  1. Camera: Samsung ST66 / ST68
  2. Aperture: f/5.2
  3. Exposure: 1/250th
  4. Focal Length: 18mm

chiltonsfacehole:

Here’s a little bit of party Chilton (is it just me, or does he look like he wants to murder me for putting the hat on him?!)

Happy birthday to the ever-so-wonderful willskissograham! *Throws confetti everywhere*

drhanniballecter:

bonearenaofmyskull is just one of my very favorite people on this website and I need a moment to take it all in.

Psh, whatever.

But likewise!

Anonymous Asked
QuestionI actually saw Hannibal's rejection of Budge as being motivated by narcissism. Budge could be an appreciative & understanding audience (the main thing Hannibal sees in Will), but their similarities would not permit the asymmetry that allows Hannibal to take on the psychiatrist & murder-mentor roles, as well as alienate his friend from others and foster dependence. I had pre-judged him and had no interest in seeing the movies where he's the protagonist, which might be why our perspectives differ. Answer

This is a good example of one of those times where I would appreciate it if this were either posted as a comment in a reblog of the post, giving you a chance to defend your stance if you’re going to take it, or if you are going to bring it to my inbox, could you please ask a question in it somewhere?

All I can say is that you’re looking at the process Hannibal engages in with Will as the end goal for Hannibal, and it isn’t. 

Yes, Hannibal wants to be Will’s mentor. To do this, he must isolate Will.

But if Hannibal is successful with Will’s therapy, Will won’t need a mentor anymore. Hannibal is not blind to this: Will reminds him of it, at the very least, when they have that conversation about the asymmetry of the psychiatrist/patient relationship. Will says, “But we’re just having conversations.” 

It hearkens back to “Sorbet,” when Hannibal first posed the question to Will about whether they were psychiatrist and patient, or if they were friends. Hannibal continually chooses to frame their relationship, and his desires for it, in terms of friendship, rather than in terms of psychiatrist and patient. When he asks Will that question about whether they’re just having conversations, it’s obvious what he wants the answer to be—and it’s not “You’re my psychiatrist.” He’s pleased because the way Will answers both acknowledges the fact of Hannibal being his psychiatrist, and that Will himself is more invested in their relationship than that, on a personal level.

Moreover, we see it in action in Hannibal’s look of pure pleasure at Will’s unpredictability—which was the point of the OP—and, more tellingly, when Hannibal is pleased at Will’s actions in “Tome-Wan.” That episode demonstrates that as Will has grown under Hannibal’s influence, he assumes a more equal place in that relationship. And Hannibal clearly is excited by and enjoys this, even though Will put Mason’s “noose” around his neck. He brings Mason back to Will’s house and allows Will to persuade him to deal with Mason himself, even though he had originally been intending on having Will do it.

And it’s the happiest he’s ever been. The episode wraps with that beautiful drawing of Patroclus and Achilles, which was an (albeit ominous) overture and an expression of Hannibal’s overwhelming love for Will. 

The asymmetry of their relationship is a part of the process, not the goal of the process. Being Will’s mentor is an honor, but Hannibal’s not short-sighted enough to think that it will last forever. The point in being a mentor is to guide someone with the goal that they will not need you anymore, and in Western culture, that they may even surpass you. Hannibal doesn’t want the mentorship to last forever, as we see in his pleasure in Will taking control of their husbanditry.

Fostering dependence is necessary to aid in Will’s therapy, and it’s about encouraging Will to emotionally tie himself to Hannibal, but it’s also about the practical concern of making sure that Will doesn’t have any personal conflicts that will prevent him from leaving with Hannibal, once Hannibal decides the time is right to reveal Abigail. But the point of that scene is that Hannibal is just as isolated as Will and just as dependent on Will. “We’re both alone, without each other.” Once Hannibal’s mentorship is complete, there will be no need to isolate Will from others: Will will do it himself, as a necessary result of what he is, just as Hannibal has done for all those years. The only friend they will each have is the other (and Abigail, but that’s a SECRET). 

Hannibal’s not interested in Tobias Budge for a variety of reasons, which are not necessarily relevant to this discussion. The point is to illustrate that narcissism and vanity don’t really draw Hannibal to Will. Budge is one small piece of evidence—Hannibal could have satisfied his narcissism and vanity with Budge—but not the sum total of the point. If you go back to my response, it’s the following paragraph about the Great Eye that contains the point.

Anonymous Asked
QuestionHave there been any news about the book they are gonna make about the show? A date or something? Sorry if you said something already. I was not as much in the fandom lately. Answer

What book? The art book, or the cookbook? 

There was something about the cookbook yesterday, but I don’t remember it being very specific. IIRC, I think the art book is coming out in January.

There’s also a Hannibal Lecter and Philosophy book in the works by an independent group, the guy who publishes all the Pop Culture and Philosophy series. I think that one is probably second quarter next year—I imagine they’ll want to release it close to when Season 3 opens. (I didn’t submit anything to it, btw. I was tempted, but not tempted enough, evidently.)

Or is there another book you’re asking about?

(Source: enfantdivine)

tattle-crime:

spookychan:

OMG- Mason and Margo Verger. #dragoncon #hannibal

SO CUTE!

nbchannibal:

image

#murder suit #tip toeing in my jordans #*squeak squeakk*

starkassembled:

the-winnowing-wind:

starkassembled:

if they try to have Hannibal put Murasaki into ANY physical harm I will fly to Toronto and shove my foot up some asses tho

POSTED 33 MINUTES AGO WITH 3 NOTES

I mean, I don’t think Hannibal will hurt Murasaki. He has no reason to and at this point, hurting many more people…

Anyway.

I don’t really think it’s explicitly stated he doesn’t kill women.  Giving them enough license for him to kill women, Mischa, Murasaki, and Clarice shaped his life, but just happened to be women. And I think the kind of men the novel created around him, especially in that era, were not men Hannibal could really mesh with anyway. He did not love them because they were women, he just loved them. I think Mads has said Hannibal is pretty much in love with everything and anything. And by the same token, he can pretty much brutalize anything as well. 

The only people he ever loved are officially, in TV show canon, no longer just women. 

They read the book and then adapt it and they have never promised anything otherwise.

~shrug~

The novels kind of do explicitly state he doesn’t kill women. His only female victim was the nurse he hurt during his failed escape attempt. She’s an outlier, not someone he targeted, but someone who had to be dealt with to escape. He hurts her badly, taking her tongue and one of her eyes, but she does not die. One of only two of his victims to ever live, Mason being the second.

It’s very important to his character that he does not target women. He’s a serial killer that hunts rude men. He doesn’t hurt women if he can avoid it and he allows them more courtesy than he awards men. It’s essential to his psyche to understand that. Women have always been important to him. And he holds them in an esteem that he does not hold men. Men are more often to him than not, just insolent rude pigs that are undeserving of life. Whereas women are mostly people to him. He’s always kind and charming to them. Even if they do something that peeves him. He holds women in higher regard. 

That’s a very unique trait to a male serial killer, especially one written in the late 70’s. a time when it was about nothing but hurting and raping and killing women.

The love and respect for women is present in every book. women have the strength whereas the men are prone to weakness and shortcomings.

This is quintessential and yet it’s something that’s curiously absent in NBC’s approach.

I think you’ve got some deep-seated misunderstandings of the novels. 

There is no indication at all that Hannibal’s attack on the nurse was an escape attempt, rather than something he did because he liked it, as his M.O. was characterized at the time. The nurse lived because she was strong and because the two attendants got in and stopped the attack. Not because Hannibal spared her. 

Hannibal ate her tongue. An attack that meant to disable in order to simply escape would not have included this detail, especially as it would have been logically more sound to deal with her quickly in order to move on to the attendants. But no—he chewed on her face. This was for fun.

Many of Lecter’s victims were not explicitly named as male or female, and there was potential that he may have killed elderly people after getting them to write him into their wills. Whether any of these were rich widows is not stated; however, if it is true, even if they were not widows, it would demonstrate that he could operate outside of his M.O., just as he did when he killed the two police officers, two medical attendants (who were absolutely not rude to him) and the tourist in his escape. Hannibal Lecter’s killings are not limited to one M.O.

More damning than that, though, is Lecter’s behavior in Red Dragon. He explicitly sent Francis Dolarhyde after Molly Foster Graham, knowing that she would be a special treat for Dolarhyde and risking her life regardless of whether he thought either Dolarhyde or Will Graham would come out on top of that affair. “Graham home Marathon, Florida,” his message read. “Save yourself. Kill them all." And there was, of course, the possibility that other women would die if Graham didn’t get help from Lecter in finding the "Tooth Fairy."

"I thought you would have some ideas. I’m asking you to tell me what they are."

"Why should I?"

Graham had anticipated the question. A reason to stop multiple murders would not occur readily to Dr. Lecter.

Whatever you may think about the incarnation of Will Graham in Bryan Fuller’s work, the Will Graham of Thomas Harris’s book knew Hannibal Lecter. If favoritism for women had been a part of Hannibal’s psychology, it would have either come out in the conversation between Graham and Springfield, or Graham would have known to lean on it in the asylum. 

The Silence of the Lambs is even worse than Red Dragon, though, because Hannibal explicitly knew that Jame Gumb was the killer and that he was located in Belvedere, Ohio, after Fredrica Bimmel’s body turned up. He read the newspapers: he didn’t need Clarice Starling’s file to tell him what was going on, and he even declared what he knew in the form of the drawing of Florence from the perspective of the Belvedere on his wall. 

All those other girls who died after Fredrica was found? They died because Hannibal Lecter let them die.

Girls he didn’t know. Girls who hadn’t been rude to him. Girls who were just that: girls, carefully groomed girls, with glitter nail polish and desperate femininity, and self esteem issues over their body size.

Hannibal is deliberately sadistic with Ruth Martin, who had been nothing but polite to him, and she at least honored the agreement that Jack Crawford had fabricated.

But that didn’t stop Hannibal Lecter from enjoying tormenting her. He may have been restrained and controlled, but he still found a way to wound her to her core. “When her pupils darkened, Dr. Lecter took a single sip of her pain and found it exquisite.”

Yeah, he hurts women, even when he can avoid it.

In SOTL, Crawford warns Starling to go armed when she’s off the Quantico base after Lecter’s escape. When Ardelia asks Starling what she’d do if she saw Hannibal Lecter in Hannibal, Starling says that she’d fill him full of bullets, if she had to. Both conversations indicate that it never crossed anyone’s mind, in world, that Starling might be safe from Hannibal because she happened to be a woman. They didn’t even think she might be safe from Hannibal even as a woman he liked. He threatens to eat Pazzi’s wife, and we don’t know whether he would have gone through with it or if he was just saying that to torment Pazzi, but we do have to accept that within the ambiguity lies the possibility. 

All of this is an example of one of those things that changed over the twenty-odd year timespan it took for Thomas Harris to write this series. As he tried to retrofit the latter two books to make the romantic relationship between Clarice and Hannibal work, he introduced concepts that didn’t mesh well with previous characterizations of either of them. Clarice gets all the attention after Jodie Foster’s complaint and refusal to play the part, but the discrepancy that is actually the most apparent and easy to demarcate is Hannibal.

This concept that Hannibal didn’t kill women is a result of that discrepancy, and though there aren’t explicit mentions of female victims who died during the Chesapeake spree, there likewise aren’t explicit mentions that he avoided killing women, either, and not all of his victims are known or named.

The likeliest answer is that his general proclivity was for male victims, but that he was, shall we say, flexible.

As for Lady Murasaki and Hannibal Rising, Harris wasn’t pleased himself with the way the last book turned out and wrote a prologue asking his audience to consider it headcanon rather than canon. 

Spaces devoted to Hannibal Lecter’s earliest years differ from the other archives in being incomplete. Some are static scenes, fragmentary, like painted Attic shards held together by blank plaster. Other rooms hold sound and motion, great snakes wrestling and heaving in the dark and lit in flashes. Pleas and screaming fill some places on the grounds where Hannibal himself cannot go. But the corridors do not echo screaming, and there is music if you like.

The palace is a construction begun early in Hannibal ‘s student life. In his years of confinement he improved and enlarged his palace, and its riches sustained him for long periods while warders denied him his books.

Here in the hot darkness of his mind, let us feel together for the latch. Finding it, let us elect for music in the corridors and, looking neither left nor right, go to the Hall of the Beginning where the displays are most fragmentary.

We will add to them what we have learned elsewhere, in war records and police records, from interviews and forensics and the mute postures of the dead. Robert Lecter’s letters, recently unearthed, may help us establish the vital statistics of Hannibal, who altered dates freely to confound the authorities and his chroniclers. By our efforts we may watch as the beast within turns from the teat and, working upwind, enters the world.

(emphasis mine)

This is an invitation to anyone doing an adaptation to change what they like. Harris himself even changed the detail about Mischa’s milk teeth being in the stool pit from how it was described in Hannibal

What the NBC series has attempted to do is to resolve these discrepancies, to make Hannibal consistent. So they’ve done things like given him an obvious enjoyment and admiration of women. They’ve recreated his affection for Mischa through Abigail. He didn’t kill Miriam Lass at least partially because he respected her. He was clearly fond of Alana and Bedelia, and did in fact run off with Bedelia.

They’ve also avoided what the-winnowing-wind identified (rightly) as benevolent sexism (at least where Hannibal is concerned): putting women on a pedestal is no less sexist than blatant misogyny. It’s less egregious, though it does its own kind of insidious damage. Hannibal’s code of ethics, as explored by the NBC show, does not grant women a special pass because they are women. Women are formidable on the show: they threaten and insult Hannibal, and sometimes they pay the price for this, just as men do. And they intrigue Hannibal, too, as Bedelia and Abigail did, and sometimes they pay a price for this too. 

What the show hasn’t attempted to do is what fans have done, which is to make Hannibal into some kind of romantic antihero to whom the hurting of women is antithetical. That’s cherry picking the novels: it ignores substantial evidence to the contrary and attempts to reinterpret ambiguous events by filtering them through the one novel that Harris himself never wished to write and even encouraged his audience to discard. 

If Bryan Fuller changes something about Hannibal’s past with Murasaki that makes their relationship more damaged, in all likelihood it’s going to be because this Hannibal tried to tempt her with violence, like he does with everybody else. But even if she were victimized in a more direct way, it wouldn’t make this story more inherently sexist than the novels. It isn’t, it never was, and to claim so is disingenuous. The TV show is not as feminist as SOTL or even Red Dragon was, but it also avoids many of the pitfalls that came with those kinds of stories—specifically the repeated victimization of women. The show does not engage in benevolent sexism, either, at least as far as Hannibal’s regard of women is concerned.

From a feminist perspective, neither incarnation of the story is perfect. Harris’s novels have worse sins, but aim higher in terms of a deliberate feminist message. Fuller’s show attempts something more subtle: a depiction of a world with a greater share of female power, that is inclusive of women and respectful of their contributions, but it can’t overcome the fact that it does not (and cannot) have a female actor in one of the two starring roles. 

NBC’s Hannibal is emphatically NOT worse than the novels in this area. It’s not necessarily better, either, but it’s definitely not worse. 

hananara:

Hannibal Season 1, Episode 12
“Her whole life, this woman was misunderstood. And all I can do is make sure her death isn’t misunderstood” – Will
“Did you fish or did you hunt?” – Will
hananara:

Hannibal Season 1, Episode 12
“Her whole life, this woman was misunderstood. And all I can do is make sure her death isn’t misunderstood” – Will
“Did you fish or did you hunt?” – Will
hananara:

Hannibal Season 1, Episode 12
“Her whole life, this woman was misunderstood. And all I can do is make sure her death isn’t misunderstood” – Will
“Did you fish or did you hunt?” – Will
hananara:

Hannibal Season 1, Episode 12
“Her whole life, this woman was misunderstood. And all I can do is make sure her death isn’t misunderstood” – Will
“Did you fish or did you hunt?” – Will
hananara:

Hannibal Season 1, Episode 12
“Her whole life, this woman was misunderstood. And all I can do is make sure her death isn’t misunderstood” – Will
“Did you fish or did you hunt?” – Will
hananara:

Hannibal Season 1, Episode 12
“Her whole life, this woman was misunderstood. And all I can do is make sure her death isn’t misunderstood” – Will
“Did you fish or did you hunt?” – Will
hananara:

Hannibal Season 1, Episode 12
“Her whole life, this woman was misunderstood. And all I can do is make sure her death isn’t misunderstood” – Will
“Did you fish or did you hunt?” – Will

hananara:

Hannibal Season 1, Episode 12

“Her whole life, this woman was misunderstood. And all I can do is make sure her death isn’t misunderstood” – Will

“Did you fish or did you hunt?” – Will